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UPDF 2 INFANTRY DIVISION

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Operations

Last updated May 15, 2015

At its inception in July 2013, the OWC was piloted in former operational zones. These are areas where FRONASA, NRA/UPDF, FEDEMU and UFM were active between the 1970s and 1980s. Military coordinators were posted to oversee the operations of the OWC.

The military officers were originally tasked to accomplish eight specified tasks spelt out by H.E. the President. The tasks were:

Provision of planting and breeding materials;

Agricultural mechanization;

Provision of low cost housing;

Provision of water;

Pension and gratuity for civilian veterans and former national forces;

Provision of microfinance services;

Overseeing the systematic improvement of infrastructure in the sectors of education, health, energy, communication and other services; and

Value addition.

The OWC started by distributing agricultural inputs first to veterans of the liberations struggles of the 1970s and ‘80s, then to all people around the country.

During its piloting phase (August 2013 – December 2014), the OWC successfully distributed inputs in the “war zone area” shown in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Quantity of Inputs Distributed During the Piloting Phase of OWC

S/N

INPUT

QUANTITY

1.

Coffee seedlings

27,330,344

2.

Tea seedlings

4,199,355

3.

Mango seedlings

412,090

4.

Orange seedlings

911,756

5.

Banana Plantlets

10,000

6.

Tree seedlings for aforestation

483,000

7.

Maize seeds

2,063.1 metric tons

8.

Beans

869.1 metric tons

9.

Cassava cuttings

48,243 bags

 

Impact of the Piloting Phase of OWC

A team of economists from Makerere University, College of Business and Management Sciences (CoBAMS) and Makerere University Business School (MUBS), recently carried out an analysis of major crops produced in Uganda. They used data from the Uganda National Panel Survey (UNPS) 2013/14, carried out by the Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS), and compared it with that of 2011/12.

The research indicates that there was a marked improvement in the level of output particularly of the crops where the OWC program intervened. Below is a summary of the findings:

Table 2: Impact of OWC on Crop Production

S/N

Crop

Output in

2011/12

(Metric Tons)

Output in

2013/14

(Metric Tons)

Change in

Output btn 2012

& 2014

(Metric tons)

1.

Maize**

2,082,300

2,873,900

791,600 (+)

2.

Beans**

532,500

747,300

214,800 (+)

3.

Rice

209,408

117,468

91,940 (-)

4.

Groundnuts

194,872

156,452

38,420 (-)

5.

Sorghum

113,548

79,585

33,963 (-)

6.

Millet

96,155

88,971

7,184 (-)

Source: Hisali & Ggoobi (2015), Crop and Livestock Production and Post-Harvest Losses in Uganda 2011/12 – 2013/14

** Crop where OWC intervened during piloting phase, otherwise no intervention

(+) increase in output

(-) decrease in output

The figures in Table 2 above clearly show that there was marked increase in the output levels for crops where the OWC intervened. Although the researchers did not establish whether this increase was particularly as a result of the OWC intervention, the fact that there was decrease in output of other crops where the program did not intervene lends credence to the hypothesis that the good performance for maize and beans could have been as a result of the OWC intervention.

Expansion of the OWC to the Entire Country

On 9th June 2014, H.E. the President directed that starting with the March – June 2015 season, the OWC program should cover the whole country. Consequently, UPDF officers were deployed in every constituency to coordinate the execution of the President‘s directive. In total there are 18 Regional/Zonal Coordinators and 242 Constituency Coordinators.

During the March – June 2015 season, the NAADS Secretariat is expected to procure and release the following inputs to OWC for distribution to the farmers country wide:

 

Table 3: Quantity of Inputs to be Distributed During the March – June 2015 Season

 

S/N

INPUT

Quantity

Needed

Quantity

Available

Discrepancy

1.

Coffee seedlings

70,915,889

37,000,000

33,915,889

2.

Tea seedlings

4,414,225

28,000,000

-23,585,775

3.

Mango seedlings

15,228,970

1,085,000

14,143,970

4.

Orange seedlings

11,150,217

2,800,000

8,350,217

5.

Banana Plantlets

36,243,379

760,000

35,483,379

6.

Tree seedlings for afforestation

49,720,423

483,000

49,237,423

7.

Maize seeds

36,952.1

1,787.5 tons

35,165

8.

Beans

73,488.6

1,309.6 tons

72,179

9.

Cassava cuttings

2,790,840

80,000 bags

2,710,840

10.

Cattle (Diary)

13,507,700

5,321 heads

13,502,379

11.

Cattle (Beef)

5,709

390 heads

5,319

12.

Pigs

2,413,337

2,106

2,411,231

13.

Goats

3,262,880

1,530

3,261,350

14.

Chicken

37,799,473

95  units  of  500

birds      each      = 47,500

33,915,889

 

It should be noted from the figures in Table 3 above that the inputs to be availed by NAADS during the March – June 2015 season will be a drop in the ocean for the whole country. It is hoped that funds will availed to purchase sufficient inputs during the coming long season (July – November 2015) and the subsequent seasons.