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Brig  Charles Byanyima Rwakakamba Commander Motorised Bde

UPDF MOTORISED INFANTRY

 

About UPDF Motorised Infantry

UPDF Motorised Infantry (MOI) is a specialised Brigade under Land Forces, with Infantry fighting vehicles (IFVs) as its basic equipments.  It forms an important element of the army in combined arms and an essential assaulting power of UPDF. 

In joint operations, Motorised Infantry supports Infantry but it can also operate independently.  Motorised infantry‘s role is to provide its technical and combat capabilities of its equipment to deliver fire power, shock action, Armour protection, Mobility and manoeuvrability  during combat. 

The Brigade is headquartered in Nakasongola District, 120 km north of Kampala city, on Kampala – Gulu high way.

MOI was a product of Mechanised regiment, formed in 1987; after the capture of state power by National Resistance Army (NRA), now UPDF. The officers of Uganda Army and National Liberation Army who were trained in mechanised, as it was commonly known, had the experience and expertise on the equipments which comprised of Czechoslovakia-made Armoured Personnel Carriers and former USSR-made T- 34. 

In 1988, Uganda acquired twelve pieces of BTR 60 from Russia and six pieces from Libya, which marked the beginning of Mechanised regiment, now Motorised Infantry Brigade.

Later, the Country acquired mine rollers, five T-54 and T- 55 tanks on which Ugandan troops received training from foreign experts.

Those who trained on T-54 became the pioneers of the now, Armoured Brigade.     

In early 1995, the first IFVs of Mambas, Buffels and Chubby systems were purchased and put under the command of field engineering unit, for a short time. They were later absorbed into Armoured Brigade in early 1998. In September 2002, MOI Sub units comprising of Mambas, Buffels and BTR- 60 separated from Armoured Brigade to form an independent Brigade, with two fighting Battalions (1MOI and 2MOI Battalion).

In September 2004, Uganda acquired Tracked IFVs, which were first put under Armoured Brigade, but in early 2005, transferred to MOI. This increment in assets in the country dictated the formation of 3MOI Battalion. 

As years passed by, Uganda acquired a variety of modern assets with different capabilities. All the existing MOI battalions were armed with better equipments and other new units created, in 2013, to guarantee security of the Country.

 

Vision

To be a professional combat ready manoeuvre formation that is aggressive and formidable in providing fire power and armour protection to own forces, thus capable of sending shock action to the enemy forces.

 

Mission

To provide support to infantry formations in order to meet their operational obligations, by use of technical and combat capability of its infantry fighting vehicles, to provide fire power, shock action, armour protection and manouvourbility in combat.

 

Roles of MOI

Combat support for fighting forces

Patrols

Evacuation of causalities

Escort duty (VIPs, Military and relief logistics)

Transportation of troops to front lines during combat

Provide support to military and civil police in emergency    situations like civil disturbance.

 

Achievements

Acquisition of modern assets

Development of capabilities in training and refurbishment of wheeled IFVs.

Development of Infrastructure including, among others, a Library, a guest house, and establishment of a modern workshop that can handle all levels of repair.

MOI has played a key role in support of the Infantry to defeat the several insurgencies in  the country. It also plays a critical role in support of AMISOM forces in the fight against Al shabaab in Somalia. It further provides escort and transport services to VIPs in Somalia.