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MINISTRY OF DEFENCE AND VETERAN AFFAIRS
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Air Forces

LT GEN CHARLES LWANGA LUTAAYA

Commander Airforce


MAJ GEN GAVAS MUGYENYI

Deputy commander Airforce


MAJ GEN JAMES BIRUNGI

Chief of Staff Airforce

Mission

To defend the country's air space, provide air support to the land forces and engage in operations other than war.

Vision

To remain the country's strategic defence power by deterring potential threats and winning wars.

There is ample evidence that the force has played its crucial role in the pursuit of its stated mission.

Building of a standard well trained officer and men core capable of adequately contributing to the fulfillment of the Uganda Air Force Mission and supporting regional campaigns.

Participation in regional peace missions including AMISOM, and task Force operations in South Sudan

Provision of support to the Land Forces in the defeat of 27 rebel groups in Uganda since 1986. The ability to identify and hit targets over long distances was more recently demonstrated when the forces destroyed LRA bases in DR Congo.

Provision of support to the Land Forces in the nearly accomplished operations to disarm Kalamajong Warriors.

Its swiftness in evacuating causalities and in assisting civil authorities in search and rescue missions is commendable. The force earned the people's praise in relief missions to Teso when the region was devastated by floods. The itinerary of success is lengthy.

The Uganda Air force's mission and vision are in consonance with the country's comprehensive Defence policy, especially in threats analysis, given the fact that we are a landlocked country. Uganda Air force is conscious of the fact that any threats to countries that constitute Uganda's lifelines to the seas are threats to Uganda and this forms a basic ingredient of Uganda's strategic Defence posture.

The Uganda Air Force is a statutory institute and a service arm of the Uganda People's Defence Forces, the other being the Land Forces. It is established by the Defence forces Act, 2005, Section 3 Sub - section 2(b).
The Uganda Air Force traces its origins from the Armed Forces Act, which was passed by parliament in January 1964. The gist of the Act underscored the necessity of defending Uganda's airspace, a need paramount for modern warfare, since World War 1. At this point in time, the cold war eventualities had necessitated post colonial states to establish strong armies that would defend the territorial integrity of African countries. Significant is that, cross border incursions were prominent as colonial borders had fueled interstate wars. It was therefore a critical moment for most states to develop their Air forces. In line with this, Uganda, the Federal Republic of Somalia, Ethiopia and Sudan invested in War planes with prime aim of fighting strategic wars.
On January 18, 1965, Prime Minister, Apollo Milton Obote formally inaugurated the Uganda Air Force at a function in which he was represented by his Minister of Information and Broadcasting, Hajji Akbar Adoko Nekyon.
On September 3, 1964 the government - owned newspaper, Uganda Argus invited suitably qualified Ugandans to join the force. The original force was built around officers drawn from the command and administration of Uganda Army general headquarters and the Uganda Police Force. From the army came Major Kanuti and Capt Andrew Tindikahwa whereas from the Police Air Wing came four officers, including Smutts Guweddeko who later rose to command a fully fledged air force at the rank of a Brigadier.
The recruits underwent basic military training in Jinja and those selected as pilots and technical crew left for training in Czechoslovakia. Between 1964 and 1970 the Uganda Air Force employed a range of aircrafts, including American made piper , C-130 and Dakota, French Fouger Majester, Italian Piaggio, Czech L- 29 and Russia's MIG 15, 17 and 21. The tasks ranged from training, through transport to actual combat operations.
In addition were Agusta Bell helicopters, and the G2 and Jet Commander craft for VIP transport.
By mid 1970's the Entebbe - headquartered force had grown by leaps and bounds, with well-established bases at Gulu and Nakasongola. But disaster struck in 1976, when the Israelis mounted an operation to rescue their hijacked citizens. Operation thunderbolt destroyed several aircrafts and what remained was taken as war booty when Idi Amin was defeated in 1979 by the Tanzanians.
In 1986, the NRM government inherited the skeleton of the air force that could only operate as an air wing of the army. However, since then much progress has been registered. A number of top - of - the- range aircrafts have been acquired and training conducted both locally and overseas.
Uganda air force remains the lynchpin in the country's strategic defence by deterring threats and winning wars.
Location of Headquarter: Entebbe, Uganda

There is ample evidence that the force has played its crucial role in the pursuit of its stated mission.

  1. Building of a standard well trained officer and men core capable of adequately contributing to the fulfillment of the Uganda Air Force Mission and supporting regional campaigns.
  2. Participation in regional peace missions including AMISOM, and task Force operations in South Sudan
  3. Provision of support to the Land Forces in the defeat of 27 rebel groups in Uganda since 1986. The ability to identify and hit targets over long distances was more recently demonstrated when the forces destroyed LRA bases in DR Congo.
  4. Provision of support to the Land Forces in the nearly accomplished operations to disarm Kalamajong Warriors.
  5. Its swiftness in evacuating causalities and in assisting civil authorities in search and rescue missions is commendable. The force earned the people's praise in relief missions to Teso when the region was devastated by floods. The itinerary of success is lengthy.
The Uganda Air force's mission and vision are in consonance with the country's comprehensive Defence policy, especially in threats analysis, given the fact that we are a landlocked country. Uganda Air force is conscious of the fact that any threats to countries that constitute Uganda's lifelines to the seas are threats to Uganda and this forms a basic ingredient of Uganda's strategic Defence posture.

  1. Defending Uganda's Airspace and supporting own land forces wherever they are.
  2. Destroying strategic enemy positions.
  3. Providing VIP transport
  4. Peace support missions and relief in the event of natural disasters.
  5. All the other duties of UPDF as per Article 208 of the constitution of the Republic of Uganda.

A Big part of the aviation component in Mogadishu under AMISOM is drawn from Uganda Air forces. They closely work with UNSOA and Somalia Civil Aviation and Metrological Authority to ensure quality service delivery and promotion of international standards in Somali Airspace and Airports.

At the time of UGABAG I (Uganda battle group 1) there aviation industry in Somalia was mostly related to aircraft delivering khat ('mairungi').

Since the inception of fight against the Al shabaab, aviation component has been significant in supporting the mission in various aspects Airports in Somalia.

Currently Uganda's Aviation component operates in the following places in Somalia;

  1. Manning Mogadishu international air port.
  2. Manning Baidoa airport.
  3. Manning Balidoogle airbase
  4. Manning Beletywene air port.

The following activities are conducted by Ugandan aviation component in Somalia;

  1. Air traffic control.
  2. Aviation security including manning of the International Airport. All access points to the airport are manned by aviation security staffs.

The presence of AMISOM that has been for long dominated by Uganda has seen improvement of not only the internal flights but also increased number of International Flights especially to and out of Mogadishu International Airport with over fifty flights in a day and operation time extended to dusk from the 0900hrs to 1200hrs a few years ago.

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